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The Technology Transfer and Partnerships Office
Area of Expertise
empty Electronics

GRC’s electronics research falls into several categories, including communications technology; fabrication of solid state microcircuits; electric power sources for in-space satellites, habitats, and probes; sensors; electric propulsion of space vehicles; hybrid power management; and microelectromechanical systems.


 Featured Technologies 

NASA’s Glenn Research Center is offering a sensor and actuator networking innovation applicable to smart vehicle or component control. This innovation requires no additional connectivity beyond the wiring providing power. This results in lower system weight, increased ease and flexibility for system modifications and retrofits, and improved reliability and robustness. The technology was specifically designed for harsh, high-heat environments but has applications in multiple arenas. The device is compatible with most communication protocols.

Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have invented a packaging methodology for integrating a microphotonic millimeter wave receiver (MMWR) using a microphotonic resonate disk on a silicon substrate. Digital information is modulated with an optical beam using a microphotonic resonate disk. This optical beam carrying the digital data signal is coupled into a fiber-optic cable for transmission, providing better signal strength over long distances that is not prone to cross-talk or electromagnetic interface. Because it integrates the optical coupling mechanism onto a silicon substrate, this innovation eliminates the need for bulky equipment to translate the signal. The carrier structure can be made quite small and simple. The technology has wide applicability and can be used with cellular equipment, including pico-cells, local area networks, and “last mile” applications that take signals to the neighborhood level.

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Technologies Available for Licensing 

Title Description/Abstract
Mobile Sensing Platform Surveys Hazardous Scenes+ Go to full description
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A High-Temperature Enabled Communication Circuit for DC Power Lines+ Go to full description
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Packaging and Integrating Microphotonic Devices+ Go to full description
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Large area plasma source + Go to full description
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High-Temperature, Radiation-Hard, Digital Logic and Analog Devices + Go to full description
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Method for Mitigating Magnetic Field Emissions of ASRGs+ Go to full description
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New Circuit Topography for JFET Digital Logic Gate Structure+ Go to full description
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Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) Functions as a Diffusion Barrier for Oxygen, Gold+ Go to full description
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Adaptive Processing Element Operates Within Microcontrollers + Go to full description
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Adaptive Phase Delay Generator Eases Synchronization Tasks for Testing Facilities+ Go to full description
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 Partnership Opportunities 

Engineers at NASA's Glenn Research Center have developed an affordable mobile sensing platform that operates in many different hazardous environments to provide first responders with data collection and analysis tools to assess and minimize risks. Equipped with adaptable plug-and-play components, NASA's rugged yet agile Mobile And Remote Sensing Hazmat Activity (MARSHA) innovation can incorporate live video, audio, and/or a suite of sensor packages. Through wireless communication, experts not at the scene can access data and offer guidance. Designed with direct input from first responders, this innovation combines NASA-developed electronics, communications configurations, and controls and data handling software with commercial off-the-shelf components. The result is a user-friendly, quickly-configurable robotic platform that gathers crucial information in dangerous situations without putting team members at risk.

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  • Page Last Updated:
    July 25, 2014
  • Page Editor:
  • NASA Official: